rick bettinger photography presents

sports betting no casino

This game has a hidden developer message. This game has unused graphics. This game has unused models. This game has unused items. This game has unused sounds. This game has unused text.

Rick bettinger photography presents afl premiership 2021 betting odds

Rick bettinger photography presents

Prior to this position, Dickerson served as Curator of European Art at the Kimbell, where he began organizing this exhibition. Even these, however, did not completely unravel their mysteries. The brothers, born in Northern France at the dawning of the 17th century, arrived. Nothing specific is known of their early training.

So who were these artists, connected to royalty while sympathetically portraying the plight of the poor? They were not country bumpkins as previous generations have characterized them. From lighting inspired by Caravaggio and his followers, to the arresting gaze in vogue in The Netherlands, to local artists including Simon Vouet, Nicolas Poussin, Georges de la Tour, and Claude Lorraine, their subject matter was as broad as their technique.

The first galleries at the Kimbell Art Museum feature altarpieces commissioned for royal churches, including Notre Dame Cathedral. The exhibition continues with portraiture, landscapes, mythological scenes, and genre paintings. Above left: Le Nain, Peasant Interior, c. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. Samuel H. Kress Collection. The effort to determine which brother painted each work remains the biggest mystery.

When canvases are signed, it is with Le Nain or the more traditional Le Nain fecit. For this exhibition, scholars assigned each a letter, brother A, B, or C. In many cases, it appears that two brothers may have worked on the same canvas. She and Dickerson spent considerable time in discussion trying to fathom generations of analysis. Aiding the curators in their endeavors were the conservators from both institutions, Claire Barry at the Kimbell and Elise Effmann Clifford at San Francisco.

Barry cites several specifics that helped with their work. While she credits the scholarship of the curators of the Paris exhibition, she says that the advent of high-resolution digital photography makes it easier to share imagery across institutions. Improvements in infrared reflectography and X-radiography have also provided greater visibility into what lies beneath the painted surface.

This parsimony extended to their recycling of canvases. She also uses the landscapes as possible examples of their working methods. Since, in some of the work, the landscape bleeds through the figure, the scholars conjecture if the brothers somehow divided the labor or if they went back and forth, working collectively or separately. Another big question surrounds the use of drawings. While none are extant, Barry and Bell feel that they probably did work from drawings.

Part of the joy of this exhibition is the amateur sleuthing that it invites. Even for those with a good eye, determining who painted what is elusive. For example, while it seems that Antoine executed the small works on copper, Bell notes that he also worked on large-scale canvases. But most of all, we want our visitors to the museum to appreciate the paintings. Below: Le Nain, Saint Jerome, or , oil on canvas, Private collection. Archival photo collage, graphite, gouache, latex paint, wood, and Plexiglas.

Addressing politicized bodies that directly contest societal homogeneity through medical conditions, race, gender, or sexuality, she creates a tension between center and periphery. In the past she has drawn inspiration from female Civil War soldiers who presented as men in order to fight for their beliefs.

Another body of work draws influence from the tale of a woman born with an atypical version of an atypical condition called Hypertrichosis that caused her to be completely covered in snow-white hair. In exploring the lives of these women, Meehan taps into the common fear of that which defies classification. She investigates the lives. Text, images, and videos co-mingle. We see the inspiration for multiple projects scattered across each page. These two lines of inquiry elaborate on her exhibition Bye Bye Blue at the Old Jail Art Center in Albany, Texas, and connect the project to different manifestations throughout time.

Meehan is presenting the echoes of human history. Bye bye blues Here, implementing ceramics, altered photographs, text, and sculpture, the artist explores the life of Olive Oatman. Oatman led an extraordinary life. Born in in Illinois, at the age of 14 her family was murdered by a Native American tribe. The only individuals to escape this fate were herself and her sister, who were enslaved, and one brother who was left for dead, but survived.

A few years later she was ransomed back to white society, full of unusual stories and marked by a bright blue tattoo on her chin. An elegant black branch with blue-dyed horsehairs cascading from it evokes her time living among the Mojave. On the facing wall, a series of altered vintage photographs of women with blue patterns painted on them speaks to a later stage in her life. Each piece is intimate. They lack the trappings of societal oddity that made Oatman a celebrity.

It is as if Oatman herself is imprisoned for her inability to be labeled, thus confining her legacy. Her subjects do not quite fit the framework of what is expected in society. She recreates the worlds of these individuals through personal narratives. As a result, we become more aware of the dictates of society and the codified system of Othering. Her inspirational images evoke the avant-garde and historical moments that still appear fresh and relevant today.

The struggles and passions of generations past still resonate. Nearby sit numerous stacks of books. For the artist, history is suspect—written by those in positions of power and distorted over time. She sees history as victim to the same pitfalls as human memory. We adapt these narratives to reflect our current context. As a result, for all of her historical research, the work remains open and intentionally mutable, as if to say what happened in the past could similarly happen today.

In March, Terrance M. Johnson founded TMJDP to enrich underserved communities through artistic programming and live performance. It certainly was for Terrance Johnson. Already 23 years old, the former college cheerleader had found his calling.

Johnson knew the transformative power of the arts long before earning his MFA. His vision for Terrance M. For the first three Saturday mornings in August, the Terrance M. Johnson Dance Project will offer free community classes that will incorporate movement therapy, drawing from different cultures and dance styles. Johnson is presenting an affordable three-day workshop, which will include several dance genres.

Johnson strongly believes that all children should have access to the arts. He plans to take his message into as many underserved schools as possible. To fully engage these youngsters, he would like them to have the necessary tools for success. For example, he would like every child learning ballet to own at. Dallas native Cami Holman is a virtuoso performing artist, instructor, and choreographer who specializes in modern, contemporary, West African, and Afro-Caribbean dance forms.

Aspects of it will provide the basis for a scholarly paper he is writing, titled, Lynched: the State of Black People in America. With performance and paper incorporating issues relating to the Civil Rights Movement, it will be, as with everything Johnson does, embedded with a sense of hope. Speaking with Johnson, it is clear that he truly engages with people from all walks of life. He would also like to work with the homeless population, perhaps offering them community dance classes at CitySquare, the Downtown antipoverty organization.

Too often, Johnson says, the homeless are unseen. Johnson and his company look forward to expanding internationally. The company has accepted an invitation to participate in Dance X Belize, an annual international festival that showcases dance from around the world. Johnson hopes to connect with Belizean youth by bringing his multiethnic dance programs to a local orphanage. I want the Terrance M. Johnson Dance Project to grow and be informed by other things.

Where furniture consignment stores of varied quality and price of inventory have long flourished, now galleries of collectable art and furniture have taken root, and sales of four and five figures have become the norm. And where traditional antique stores along Slocum, even those with the very highest level of inventory, are experiencing slumping sales, designers and homeowners are flocking to the clean-lined modernism of mid-century design.

Art collectors have seen the inherent and lasting value of the modern masters. Collectors and designers have also driven this movement both through the value of great antiques and the clean, spare aesthetic. Museums, long sparsely furnished with Knoll sofas and benches in leather and stainless steel, have influenced art collectors who want to create a museum-like atmosphere in their own homes. And these residences, published in glossy magazines, propelled the interest in modernism to the general public—especially design from the mid-century.

In a throwaway age, buying a chair or painting of value is always a good investment. Here are just a few of the most notable of the modern and midcentury galleries located in the Design District. Abby and Wlodek Malowanczyk started collecting in California thirty years ago and moved to Texas in with their extensive assemblage of architect-designed furniture, lighting, and art.

From their home and gallery designed by Russell Buchanan on Irving Boulevard, and also a 1stdibs space in New York, they sell to collectors and museums worldwide, yet only about fifteen percent of their clients are Dallas-based. Abby is renowned and respected for her knowledge of mid-century masters and can easily point out the qualities of the original pieces and why they are important.

The arms are wider than the new ones and the upholstery is properly done with springs and foam rather than just foam. Opposite: Frits Henningsen mahogany and fabric sofa. Above: Pre-war Alvar Aalto Tank chair with curly birch arms and wool upholstery. Both exclusively at Collage. He also appreciated great modern design from any and all design periods. Sputnik Modern was born from there, moved to Henderson Avenue, and then relocated to the Design District about three years ago.

He also curates fine art from the mid-century period. In the early s, Mategot left furniture design to devote himself full-time to tapestry work, becoming one of the leaders of the modern movement in French tapestries. Four years ago she opened Give and Take, a consignment store of art and collectables. She recently changed the name to circa20c to reflect her particular interests.

Names you know like Brno, Hans Wegner, Knoll, and Platner shine against bright white walls in attractive room settings, like a fluid glass coffee table by Laurel Fyfe, and a fabulously decadent Glacier table from Lion in Frost. Nelson lovingly refurbishes when necessary the pieces she buys and shows them off at their best. Unearthed at circa20c on Riverfront Blvd. You can find classics from Mastercraft, a vintage Baker dining table and chairs from the Far East Collection designed by California designer Michael Taylor, and John Widdicombe pieces at prices far below 1stdibs or at the trade showrooms where they are currently represented.

Of course, most of these furnishings will need to be recovered or refurbished, but bargains are to be found by someone with a good eye. They now have a square-foot warehouse in the Design District and encourage clients to visit and shop, as they show only about one tenth of their inventory in their showroom on Riverfront Boulevard.

The award-winning showroom is designed to be an art gallery as well—the furnishings are spare and museum-like to show off the great fiber art of Jane Knight. After seeing just a few of her works, Rucker and Gream were impressed enough by how unique and dynamic each piece was that they bought her whole inventory.

Jane Knight left to right , Hangie with Bells, 72 x 22 dia. All available at 20cdesign. Right: A set of five cantilevered side or dining chairs designed by Verner Panton for Studio Hag, circa Available at Dallas Moderne at Jacques Lamy. He is concentrating on postmodern furnishings from the s—s. These pieces are complemented by abstract and cubist art, op art by Dordevic Miodrag, graffiti by Lionel Lamy, and woven African fabric art by Jacques Lamy.

Take a jaunt some day to the Dallas Design District, and visit some of these galleries. Enjoy seeing the hand of the designers who shaped the modern movement years ago, whose designs are as fresh and timeless as when they were first conceived and made—over sixty years ago. A modern ranch house articulated by Vernon Berry of Sharif-Munir.

Along the way, you are entranced by the hilly, winding terrain dotted with groves of oak trees—it looks like scenes from yesteryear of the old Texas ranchlands. When the owners found an old equestrian center on an idyllic piece of land about an hour north of Dallas, they knew just who to call to create their dream house. Then they enlisted her to redo both their home in Preston Hollow and a house in Vail, Colorado.

They knew that she could use both their extensive contemporary and Western art collections and their love of bright color to create exactly what they wanted. I convinced them to start with a neutral palette and add the spectrum of warm colors leading to red—yellow, gold, orange, and then red. The results create a soft glow in the home lit by all the abundant natural light flooding the house through floor-to-ceiling windows. Solar shades can be used for privacy or sun protection when needed but disappear seamlessly when not in use.

The wine bar features backlit custom artwork by Richard Bettinger. Architect Vernon Berry with Sharif-Munir Custom Homes designed the approximately twenty-thousand-square-foot under roof ranch home with one thing in mind—to make the home fit the site so as to fully enjoy the southerly breezes and the view of the fountains in the lakes. The house is really one room deep with wall-to-wall windows looking toward the beautiful scenery and bringing the outdoors in.

We created a seamless floor plan with no thresholds and with the same wall color throughout, so that the rooms flow into each other. To continue the flow of inside to outside and vice versa, a fun element was added to the decks. The tan of the Oklahoma stone used exclusively on the exterior keeps the look of the house informal and adds to the golden light of colors used within.

Smiley and her assistant designer Dani Burbidge exclusively. We created four distinct areas within the space to bring it to a human scale—a kitchen area, a dining area, seating in front of the fireplace, and a bar. We designed the kitchen to be open to the dining area, but raised the bar to hide preparation areas.

The focal point of the kitchen is the hanging glass ceiling art of blown-glass plates and pulled-glass ribbons designed by Carlyn Ray and Emily Teng Yan. The dining tables are a combination of an amber-resin top by Ironies from Culp Associates, paired with a stainless-steel-column base from David Sutherland. We ordered the iconic Brno chairs and covered them in orange leather from Spinneybeck.

All rugs in the house are works of art in themselves—designed by Smiley and rendered in hair on hide by Alex Husseini, the charming owner of Dallas Rugs. Custom-sized sofas by J. Robert Scott front the massive. In the guest suite, clockwise from left: custom window-facing bed ensemble designed by Mary Anne Smiley; Christopher Martin, Sonora, , 60 x in. Opposite: The hallway serves as a contemporary art gallery including clockwise from top left: Beat Zoderer, Excentric Hours No.

Donghia Esha Altal Lamps perch on Lorin Marsh Tuxedo bedside chests with high gloss bleached goatskin from David Sutherland; striped custom cowhide rug from Dallas Rugs; above and flanking the bed: Christopher Martin, Elestial 2, 96 x 48 in. The branch light by Jonathan Browning from David Sutherland brings the height of the ceiling down to room scale to provide a comfortable sitting area.

James Lockeridge designed this fire screen, as well as all the fireplace screens in the house. A backlit painting on acrylic by Richard Bettinger is behind the bar. On both sides of the fireplace and throughout the home are bronzes of Native Americans by New Mexico sculptor Dave McGary who created incredibly lifelike sculpture using the lost wax method accented with patina and paint.

His intricately detailed statues with their expressive faces, colorful feathers, and beads just beg to be touched. Two stunning saddles mounted on specially designed acrylic stands flank the entry door like sentries. Some of these parade saddles were designed specifically for only one parade, but the workmanship is outstanding.

The leather is carved with floral and foliate designs; the sterling-silver mountings are etched in intricate Western and geometric motifs. Other historical memorabilia include a pair of spurs worn by the legendary cowboy, Tom Mix. The gallery wing fronting the billiard room and leading to the master suite is full of great Western art by such masters as R.

The colorful billiard room is dominated by a custom pool table with a cobalt blue euro cloth top commissioned from Mitchell Exclusive Billiard Designs. When she saw a large-scale amorphous-polished stainless-steel sculpture in Miami, she knew it was perfect for the entry to the home. After approval from her clients, she contacted the Paul Kasmin Gallery. Several great additions to the art collection were found at the Dallas Art Fair. The draped ottoman sculpture and other drip-anddrill paintings are by Markus Linnenbrink, represented by Taubert Contemporary in Berlin.

Linnenbrink builds his compositions using layer upon layer of controlled drips in saturated, glossy colors evoking the stripe paintings of Morris Louis. Using serape, nails, and board, Esparza composes his art by stretching threads from the serape over geometric shapes formed by the wooden strips. You can also admire an Esparza installation at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Several contemporary works from prominent Dallas galleries line the hallway leading to the guest wing. Of particular note is. A custom bed designed by Mary Anne Smiley that faces the windows dominates the guest room. The spacious master bedroom seems to glow with the golden colors of the striped rug by Dallas Rugs, the pillows, and the complementary golden oranges of the Barcelona chairs from Knoll. The acrylic desk by Vladimir Kagan recently autographed by the designer when he was in town , seems to float in the space.

Wall-to-wall windows look out at the fountain and a sculpture by Juanluis Gonzales from Samuel Lynne Galleries; a winding metal stairway leads up to a cozy aerie—a place to see for miles and miles, or just enjoy a lovely sunset. The ranch is a comfortable marriage of contemporary art, Western art, and colorful furnishings.

The interiors flow to the exterior deck areas with inviting room settings of teak tables and chairs from Sutherland Teak and Perennials Fabrics. But, here, sitting on the sparkly deck, the art is provided by the pastoral scenery of lakes, rolling hills, and oak trees. To her right: Mark Handforth American, b. People like Todd Fiscus of Todd Events. Laura Owens American, b. Her roles involve a lot of hatchanging: soliciting and cultivating corporate sponsors, developing graphic designs, event planning, procuring auction art, donor relations, strategizing, producing the auction catalogue, and logistics for the week of festivities.

Our village is the thing that differentiates TWO x TWO from every other event, not only by making things run seamlessly, but by helping keep our expenses to a minimum, and putting more dollars to the good at the end of the day. Part of my job is to be the responsible custodian of those figures, but also to be the responsible individual, because it falls under the Contemporary department, and to spend those monies wisely. LA-based Laura Owens. Photograph by Kevin Tachman.

Installed on the vast front lawn is Robert Irwin American, b. For this building, Langford chose the triangle as the primary motif. Originally a sign of oppression, triangles evolved to become the symbol of empowerment for the LGBT community.

In addition to constructing a triangularshaped building, he also selected triangular floor tiles for the two-story, 20,square-foot facility. This facility serves two largely underserved populations within the LGBT community: youth and seniors. Because Resource Center meets the counseling and medical needs of these groups as well as those living with HIV, foundations that usually support such issues gave generously. Keith Foundation, among others.

Shortly after it opened, it became the site for an impromptu memorial for those slain in Orlando, attracting hundreds of people and providing a platform for city leaders including Mayor Mike Rawlings and Police Chief David Brown to speak. In addition to the magnificent architecture, Resource Center also has an outstanding collection of art. Cox tasked Kincaid with this mandate. Committee members prepared a list of artists whose works they thought would enhance the building. Not only was the art donated, it also quickly became the project with which artists wanted to be involved.

Kincaid is aware of how often artists and galleries are asked to donate work. With that in mind, the committee took a cautious approach, trying not to ask for too much. Courtesy of the artist. Gift of the artist and Craighead Green Gallery, Dallas. Opposite clockwise from top : Cece Cox tasked celebrated artist Ted Kincaid to spearhead the art committee.

Behind the artist: Ted Kincaid, Thunderhead , , lacquer-based pigment on canvas. Gift of the artist and Talley Dunn Gallery. John Wilcox — , Double Ought, , ink on paper. Heyd Fontenot b. Gift of the artist and Conduit Gallery.

Installed in the light well above the staircase, the work seems to thrust the energy from the first-floor gathering space upward, propelling it into a colorful symphony fashioned from thread. The collection will be a continuous work in progress. Smith in a conference room. When sculptor Deborah Ballard came through the space, she too wanted to be a part of it. Her life-sized work will be installed outdoors.

Unusual angles throughout the building are a result of its unique structure. Jay Shinn selected one of these odd spaces for his totemic installation, created for this project. Gift of the artist and Craighead Green Gallery. On a facing wall a suite of seven graphite and ink drawings by Heyd Fontenot reflects the diversity of the people who visit Resource Center daily. One of the defining features on the second floor is a large public event space.

Within the LGBT community, many of these towns are synonymous with discrimination. At night, visible from the street, these works glow as beacons. They also provided the programmable panel used to create light patterns for this outline. Just as Resource Center is as much an educational facility as it is a community center, the art serves as more than eye candy.

Wall plaques, written by Shackelford, explain each work and offer a brief biography of the artist. The art is seen as an integral part of the center. According to Cox, it is usually among the top four Resource Centers across the country. Our expectation for ourselves is higher. Gift of the artist. Gift of Talley Dunn. On the stairwell: Nancy Whitenack, owner of Conduit Gallery. Above the staircase, Gabriel Dawe b. Deborah Ballard, Welcome, —16, unique cast stone, iron, bronze, and wax, Opposite above : Annette Lawrence b.

Below : Allison V. Smith color photograph, 40 x 40 in. Gift of the artist and Barry Whistler Gallery. And, perhaps surprisingly, this collision of divergent entities is splendidly articulated in ancient texts. Broadly considered the culmination of the Vedas, the Upanishads relentlessly underscore the interrelatedness of the known and unknown worlds.

And whether you feel comfortable with the notion of the Western via negativa or the aforementioned Vedic verbiage, it becomes apparent that we are all, each of us, inextricably bound together in a sometimes messy, yet marvelously spangled, existential spectacle. For the scientifically minded, it might be noted that humans, animals, water, and rock— literally everything—is imbued with stardust from the Big Bang. Thus, aside from philosophical considerations, there are multiple sources for insight regarding this affection for a fused world.

That being said, art reliably conveys the notion in ways that are especially deft and subtle. One example of this is finding ways that deliver an understanding of Islam to the. Hispanic community. This is not only extraordinary—it inspires us and helps us move forward with our goal.

It gives us an opportunity to offer programs that inspire a compassionate understanding of various cultures…and that is precisely what the Crow wants to do. Clay Between Two Seas: From the Abbasid Court to Puebla de los Angeles, an upcoming exhibition at the Crow Collection of Art, spells out this observation in ways that are both sumptuous and instructive.

Thus, while wisdom literature underscores the fact that global concerns are infinitely and deeply pertinent, there are also pulse-quickening objects that hold within them the power to demonstrate how cultures, thought, and cosmologies are interlaced, remade, and given new trajectories. It, amazingly, shows us how art, people, philosophy, and even religions coalesce in ways that effortlessly confound ideologies and constricted thinking.

This page: Left: Tin glaze earthenware jar with lid tibor con tapa , Puebla, late 17th century. Photo by Michael Calderwood. Where to start? During its duration, the Muslim world became an intellectual center for science, philosophy, and medicine and, in fact, eventually established the House of Wisdom in Baghdad, a center of learning where Muslim and non-Muslim scholars alike sought to gather and synthesize knowledge from Roman, Chinese, Indian, Persian, Egyptian, North African, Greek, and Byzantine origins.

And, as many Westerners know, were it not for their efforts, many fundamental texts that form the Western canon would have been lost: Aristotle, Ptolemy, and Euclid are only three such examples among many. In fact, due to the Manila Galleon trade, the currency of China during that era was counted in silver ingots. Importantly, beautifully crafted items began pouring into the new world in the form of ceramics, textiles, paintings, and more—and, in exchange, an extravagant expenditure of wealth fueled commerce.

And, importantly, the imported goods created a thriving artistic and cultural center in Puebla, Mexico. Folding screens, elegant vases, and other objects were created that distinctly bore hints of Spanish Moorish , Chinese, and explicitly Islamic culture. The Curator Emeritus of the Crow, Dr. Caron Smith, is located in New York and graciously offered her time to talk about the exhibition. Thus, she immediately traced Talavera Poblana, the tin-glazed earthenware made in Puebla de los Angeles, Mexico, to its origins in Chinese porcelain.

Hispano-Moresque decorative vocabulary. For example, Chinese porcelain was highly desirous due to its delicate construction and luminous sheen. Thus, the native artists sought to emulate it by creating their own glaze, a tin-lead mixture, which allowed them to approximate the luster of Eastern pieces. Also, different clays, firing temperatures and pigments, of course, all posed challenges, but Talavera Poblana exhibited an allure that was highly desirous even when compared to works from East Asia, not to mention Europe and Islamic lands.

This is evident in the Baroque period, during which the influence of Mexico in world commerce was significant. And whether one is most at home inside the Cathedral Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe in downtown Dallas or a mosque, temple, or synagogue in outlying areas, it will become clear that human interaction is strongest and best when understood as a varied compilation of rich and divergent cultures.

In fact, it may well come to light that we all swim in a single sea—and it is shared, gloriously luminous, and worthy of adoration by all. This page: Cylindrical bowls, , tin glaze earthenware, Opposite: Jan Hendrix, tin glaze earthenware jar tibor , Steller, bstellar.

Fall looks become languorous as the sun crosses the equator with an anything-goes mix of romantic folly. On Allison: knit top with sequined skirt, studded boots, navy and gold earring, all by Mulberry, NorthPark Center. Through Bettinger's hero-centric storytelling methods, you'll understand how to show the jurors that they must be the heroes, and "save the day" with a verdict that speaks not just for your client, but for humanity at large.

Filled with a plethora of actual transcript and easy-to-understand examples, Bettinger takes you through opening, in which you define the story roles of everyone in the courtroom, through direct- and cross-exam, which further the character development roles in your story, to closing, in which you show the jurors that they are the only ones who can write the conclusion to the story and save the day.

You'll discover the difference between a case and a story, and learn how to find the point of view in your stories that will appeal to a jury. This masterpiece on storytelling concludes with a series of story-creating exercises to help get your brain thinking in terms of "story" instead of "case," and to get your creative juices flowing.

Make your next jury the hero and get your Verdict with a capital "V" by following Bettinger's storytelling advice. An innovative, creative work that will help every lawyer better represent her client in the courtroom. Carl integrated Homer and Cervantes with popular cinema to help us understand how to tell a story, the importance of juror empowerment, and the importance of self-empowerment.

A triumph. Playing the hero, Mr. Bettinger has restored my faith. Every courtroom lawyer has one book that he or she reaches for in order to prepare for the next major trial. This is the book I will reach for from now on. Carl gives you what the Reptile left out.

Learn why fear is not the end all and be all. Carl Bettinger is an outstanding trial lawyer and creative thinker who has authored one of the best books ever written on trial advocacy, Twelve Heroes, One Voice. Twelve Heroes, One Voice brings to light how the hero-villain-mentor relationship between the jury and lawyer can be examined and illuminated in-depth.

Carl explains how to reach justice alongside the jury. No tricks, no illusions, no slight of hand—just the plain, simple truth. Twelve Heroes, One Voice is the best book I have read about the fundamentals of storytelling as they apply in the courtroom. It is clear, practical and filled with real-life examples.

If you want to learn how to empower jurors, you need to read this book. This book provides the magic sword and armor to transform jurors from ordinary people into heroes and sheroes empowered to make our communities safer through their verdicts. It may even help you find the hero in yourself.

A unique take on how to make your case come to life in the courtroom by actively engaging the people who matter the most in trial—the jurors—through empowerment and hero-making. Like all good stories, Twelve Heroes, One Voice draws us ever onward. Bettinger shows us why and how to care for our clients.

It invites us all to be larger than our present conception of ourselves. This is an instant classic and I have no doubt that it will be instructive to its readers for years to come. Bettinger explains theoretical innovations in trial advocacy in practical terms that readers will immediately understand and undoubtably incorporate in their trial practice.

Twelve Heroes One Voice does a fantastic job of synthesizing the research and teaching done by leading neuroscientists and trial advocates in an era that will be remembered as a renaissance for legal education thanks to Trial Guides. The book succeeds in providing practical applications to complicated theories and offers clear instruction and illustrative examples to aid readers in applying his teachings to their trial work.

I read [Twelve Heroes, One Voice] last month in the week before a trial and took what I learned into the trial. It helped me to avoid being either apologetic or timid in my role with them I am more inclined toward these than I am inclined toward confidence , as I understood I had a specific role to play in their journey that was necessary for them to accomplish a verdict that was true and just.

It also helped me understand the boundaries of my relationship with them. It was important for them and for me—for us—to speak to the work they would have to do without me. In the end, the jury was heroic and we obtained a fantastic result for my client. It resonated with me and transformed my prep and our trial. I gave up the power to write the ending.

There was no reptile in the courtroom. Only heroes. Thank you. Two weeks ago I tried a rear end back and shoulder injury case of a 76 year old woman hit in Rhode Island. Unlike Mass. I incorporated so much of your work in voir dire especially recognizing the specialness of the jurors and affirming their power.

Интересна, nxt crypto currency news недавно

Her uplifting spirit adds a positive element to the Fort Worth and Dallas Studios! Ryan joined Gittings in after operating his own wedding photography business. Ryan adopted a fondness for art and technology at an early age and was captivated by the idea that a handheld device that could freeze a moment in time. A real interest in photography began when he developed his first dark-room photograph in high-school. Outside of portrait photography, Ryan also enjoys capturing landscapes, architecture and the cosmos above.

Connect with our Fort Worth Team Today. He also is your partner in arranging portrait appointments, assisting with portrait selections and with portrait installations. As he grew, he further developed his skill in high school as the yearbook and newspaper photographer and after attending Cedarville University, received a degree in Professional Photography with Honors from Elkins Institute in Dallas.

In , he began his career at Gittings in the Dallas studio, becoming the lead photographer and then was transferred to the Houston location in Brad is a well known in the industry for his excellence in customer service and talent. Connect with our Houston Greenway Team Today. Jason started work with Gittings as a digital technologist, handling very detailed digital retouching and printed glossies projects.

Jason began to build his portfolio to include executive portraits, environmental photography, as well as working directly with clients during the development of large-scale portrait projects. Jason prides himself on delivering consistent quality, and enjoys traveling while working on global projects for our executive clients. Kelley is the Operations Assistant at Gittings. She also helps maintain our client database and accommodates client requests. She is particularly focused on ensuring that our clients consistently receive the professional service our agency is known for.

Connect with our Houston Downtown Team Today. Greg is Creative and Operations Director of GittingsLegal — a Gittings businesses focused on serving the legal industry globally, with more than 85 photographers worldwide. As a passionate photographer, Sam has tapped into the art of storytelling through a single, captured moment. Sam was previously a photographer with Gittings and returned to the company as the Operations Director in During his hiatus from Gittings, he ran his own successful photography business, giving him terrific insight into the business side of photography.

This powerful combination of portrait artistry and successful business management experience makes Sam ideal to run operations for Gittings. Clients benefit from his photography skills, artistic talents, and savvy management that elevates the quality of every project. Learn More About Gittings.

Rick W. Angela Bettinger. Take a look at this image for example. The eye wants to travel throughout the photograph but will typically venture away from the faces and give far too much attention to the bare arm. This is a great example of how several things in a single choice of shirt can distract and draw attention within a portrait.

Patterns almost always will cause this problem. Areas with the most contrast in an image will always draw more attention that solid colors as they not only contrast with what others are wearing, but they also have a great deal of contrast within the design of the pattern.

This is highly problematic for portraits as they truly can diminish the quality and enjoyment people can gain from looking at an image such as this example. When looking at this image, you can see that the eye constantly wants to look at the patterned shirt and can even get stuck only looking at this area in the photograph.

Wearing something that is different and obvious in a photograph is rarely a good idea. In this image, it's clear to see that the blue plaid shirt is drawing attention to itself. Not only is the pattern in the shirt bringing vertical and horizontal lines into the picture, but the color of the blue isn't exactly within the same color palate that the others are wearing.

This can completely ruin a portrait and it can easily affect whether or not you end up liking the image or not. Be cognizant of your wardrobe choices as it can completely change the portrait experience and likely your taste in the overall photograph.

Colored clothing certainly can be an appropriate choice for a portrait however be careful when choosing the colors. Colors should be carefully coordinated and must work well with the other colors in the image. In this example, the brighter shades are competing with the darker shades.

Depending on who you are, your eye may want to look more at the dark green shirt or perhaps you may look more heavily at the light grey shirt. Either way, what is not being looked at? The faces in the picture!

HOE TE BETALEN MET BITCOINS WORTH

She hopes the examples set with the opening of Resource Center and the good work of Terrance M. Johnson Dance Project will help send ripples of hope, goodwill, and understanding throughout the Dallas community. Patron tapped Peggy to explore the six vintage modern showrooms in the Dallas Design District. She also caught up with awardwinning designer, Mary Anne Smiley, on her ranch project in Gunter. In addition to freelance writing, Levinson consults with showrooms, artisans, and interior designers so they can function successfully and profitably, while preserving what makes each unique.

For this issue, Justine visited with Margaret Meehan in Studio. He consults with architects, designers, and artists to bring their vision to light. A frequent Patron contributor, John is called upon to photograph homes where art is at the forefront of design. Philip Johnson. Robert A. Howard Meyer. The list goes on. Dallas has its share of exquisite properties by icons both past and future.

You know them. We know them. And we know they command a special touch—a reverence and respect. Respected and widely known in the business community, this elite group networks tirelessly to promote the sale of your home or find the home of your dreams. When you hire a Master, you get the combined benefit of highly-trained and experienced agents—all working for you.

Please join us in support of the local performing arts community, with signature cocktails, a black tie formal dinner, and the exciting Live Custom Auction featuring exotic travel and once-in-a-lifetime experiences. Tickets available at taca-arts. Cooper Ave. Discarded: Photographs by Anthony Hernandez runs through Aug. Through Aug. A partnership between photographer R ichard Misrach and artistmusician Guillermo Galindo explores the border between the U.

Texas Folk Art is on view through Sep. Identity continues through Oct. The museum sponsors a Lunchtime Talk every Thursday at 1 p. Public Tours take place on Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p. Image: Pedro Reyes, Sundial , Carrara marble and brass, Courtesy of the artist and Lisson Gallery. The museum is celebrating International Day of Peace with Peace Day Dallas by offering free admission and a chance to meet three Holocaust survivors on Sep.

Join Dr. Nicolas Party will present his first solo museum exhibition in the U. In her first U. The Kimbell has a world-renowned permanent collection, known for its minimal size but distinguished level of extraordinary quality and eminence. Join the Latino Cultural. This multidisciplinary arts center was founded for the preservation, development, and promotion of Latino and Hispanic arts and culture. In his exhibition at The MAC, Schenck uses mud both physically as a material and conceptually as a vehicle to acknowledge social labels and redefine them.

The exhibition opens Sep. On Aug. Process and Innovation: Carlotta Corpron and Janet Turner exploring art created by the two while teaching and working in Texas in the s and s, runs through Aug. Connections will return in September for an informal three-day program for individuals with early-stage dementia Sep. Celebrate the music and dance of Andalucia on Sep. Image: Karen Ami, Meditations on Suffering, 28 x 23 x 3 in.

Scope Out Sculpture puts the spotlight on materials, techniques, and artists, Aug. Target First Saturdays takes place Aug. An adults-only Social Science after-hours event takes place Aug. Meet super scientists at Discovery Days on Aug. First Thursday Late Night offers the opportunity to create robots and more on Sep. Perform experiments at Discovery Days on Sep. Courtesy of MacGillivray Freeman Films.

The museum also hosts monthly events including First Friday and Family Day. Comedian Baron Vaughn brings a few nights of absurdity to the stage from Aug. On Sep. Photography by Jan Versweyveld. Image: National Touring Company. Photo credit: Joan Marcus. An Evening with Terry Bozzio presents the drum legend on Aug. Experience the mystery of E. The Extra-Terrestrial, Sep. Photography by Karen Almond.

First performed in , The Rite of Spring caused a riot. A tragic love story will come to life in Prokofiev Romeo and Juliet, Sep. The festival celebrates local artists and spirit through a series of sixty-second shorts. Indie pop-rock duo, Tegan and Sara, will stop in Dallas for a concert on Sep.

Donovan will celebrate 50 years with a stop in Dallas on Sep. Glen Hansard will be at the Majestic on Sep. From the boulevard to far beyond it, the LX is proof that luxury is never out of place. Options shown. The LX is designed to meet most off-road driving requirements, but off-roading is inherently dangerous. Abusive use may result in bodily harm or vehicle damage.

Lexus encourages responsible operation to help protect you, your vehicle and the environment. Seatbelts should be worn at all times. Do not allow passengers to ride in cargo area. Ratings achieved using the required premium unleaded gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or higher. If premium fuel is not used, performance will decrease.

The Wedding Singer, based on the popular Adam Sandler movie, takes you back to the s, beginning Sep. Product of Sweden. Distilled from grain. Check the website for dates. A percentage of all jewelry sales go to Craft Emergency Relief Fund which offers direct financial and educational assistance to craft artists. The project presents the world as a place to discover.

Continuum furthers the search for new variations to the ceramic forms and surface treatments Miller has developed over the last four years. Image: Lindsey Dunnagan, The Journey Home, 19 individual panels, watercolor, ink, salt, and acylic on acrylic panel, 48 x 96 in. Martin in three locations, Dallas, Aspen, and Santa Fe.

Sirvet is a contemporary sculptor who works in mediums such as aluminum, steel, wood, and acrylic. NTT runs Aug. Turk is a self-taught, Houstonbased artist, creating multidimensional collages. The artist continues her trajectory of examining the framework of time through the various mediums of video, painting, and performance.

Courtesy of the artist and Cydonia. Washington High School seniors pursuing the study of visual arts. His new series of paintings is based on barbeque that captures the culture of the tradition and pride, as well as the delight experienced by devoted patrons with his signature iconic imagery.

The gallery assists collectors looking for masterworks from the Mexican School and Latin American Master Painters, as well as art from the 19th century and Mexican Colonial Art. Kevin Todora opens Sep. Through Oct. Image: Anna Membrino, Lady, , acrylic and oil on canvas, 72 x 60 in. Warren recreates natural forms on paper and canvas, creating vibrant and aweinspiring compositions. The GossMichael Foundation is one of the leading contemporary British art collections in the United States and has recently relocated to Wycliff, Ste.

The exhibit shows through Aug. Image: James Buss, Untitled 02, 12 x 10 x 0. Courtesy of Holly Johnson Gallery. Dallas, Texas Continues Through October. Robertson fuses concrete and textiles into provocative objects while Shayema Rahim transforms drab wax into brilliantly colored encaustic paintings. His work is filled with the contradictions one sees in everyday life. KSG remains preeminent in Dallas as a place for advice and guidance in pursuing and evaluating great works of art.

Image: Hunt Slonem, Untitled Bunnies , oil on canvas, 48 x 48 in. Saturday, August 6th and Sunday, August 7th pm both days. In each of the three upstairs rooms of Level, one microphone is placed to pick up the sound generated in recording sessions to be released later in the fall for digital download.

COM Paper and Power opens Sep. Image: Scott Eakin, Ghost of a Firefly, 36 x 36 in. Through Sep. Representing emerging and mid-career artists from across the globe, the gallery works to create a dialogue between institutional and private curators, collectors, educational art venues, and the general public. Reverence is a solo show. The exhibit coincides with the Centennial Celebration of the U. National Park Service. Opening Sep.

An artist talk takes place Sep. Ervay, Sep. The small gallery will concurrently feature the works of Robin Ragin in Upstart Crow. The Magnolia will then show work from Cynthia Miro, on view throughout October. Other artists and artworks are available by request only. For current exhibits visit us at www. Beginning Sept. Each of the artists repurposes and recycles materials to make their art. Through Dec. The exhibition runs Aug. However, a monitor will showcase student artworks from the New Media Program.

Dennis Blagg, Fresno I, , oil on canvas, 54x96 inches russelltether. Stoker, a San Antonio artist, naturalist, and environmental activist, uses a splatter technique to create painterly representations of the flora along the Guadalupe River. David H. The full catalog will be available Aug. Years after taking it, she grabbed a shot of a naked child racing toward the Indonesian surf, capturing him just before he dove into the water.

Photoshopping the boy into the ruins of Machu Picchu proved to be the perfect legerdemain. On the other end of her spectrum, On Edge is a barely manipulated photo of a hilltop house in Chile; the dramatic black-and-white gradations of the image highlight the precarious scenario, and the striations of the clouded sky enhance the drama.

Juggling some dealers for the Dallas Art Fair each year and her own accessories label, the year old is known for her ever-so-calm demeanor and creative appeal. You have played a meaningful role in the evolution of the fair from its infancy to an internationally respected contemporary art event. Will you tell me about your personal history with the fair and what your new role will entail? The fair is a grassroots organization, and witnessing its growth has been a wonderful experience.

I started as a college intern for the Dallas Art Fair in During my first fair, I felt the energy and passion that both the Dallas and international arts communities had for the event, and I knew I had to be a part of it. Immediately, I saw what a huge asset this was for our city. When an opening at the fair presented itself in the late fall of , I jumped on it, and I have been here ever since. Back then, I was more of a manager, working behind the scenes to make sure everything ran smoothly.

Over the past few years, my duties have expanded to include a more public profile. This new role. I work with our Preview Gala beneficiaries the Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center, and Dallas Contemporary and local institutions, as well as our sponsors to create a robust schedule of events. AH: I have personally had a wonderful experience working with you and your team on education programs over the last four years. We always endeavor to educate and cultivate the collecting community.

We began working with school-age children via the encouragement of our sponsor, Neiman Marcus. With your personal guidance and expertise as the Paula and Jim Crown Director of Learning, we have brought hundreds of children and teenagers to the Dallas Art Fair. They are given the opportunity to see artwork from all over the world and engage with gallerists and artists.

This can be a pivotal experience for someone considering a career in the arts. This past year we launched our Student Sunday program. This allowed anyone with a student ID to come to the fair for free on Sunday. Can we expect anything new and exciting in ?

KC: There is a synergy amongst the museums and non-profit. Since we strive to be better each year, we are currently developing the program. AH: A woman of many talents, you are an artist yourself. Tell me about Desert Hide, the company you run with your husband Jack. What began as a passion project and expression of our personal style has become a fullblown business.

A labor of love, we personally pick all of our materials and construct each piece by hand. You can visit our website at www. KC: As the Dallas Art Fair enters its ninth year, we are striving to connect ourselves with the community year round. We are currently developing programs for a month-to-month engagement with our audience.

The Dallas community is vital to the success of the Dallas Art Fair. My hope is that the Dallas arts scene will grow with us as we move into the future. If that is not enough of an endorsement, consider that this is only the second time in over years that there has been a comprehensive exhibition devoted to the work of brothers Antoine, Louis, and Mathieu Le Nain. The last one took place in Paris in the late s. Prior to this position, Dickerson served as Curator of European Art at the Kimbell, where he began organizing this exhibition.

Even these, however, did not completely unravel their mysteries. The brothers, born in Northern France at the dawning of the 17th century, arrived. Nothing specific is known of their early training. So who were these artists, connected to royalty while sympathetically portraying the plight of the poor? They were not country bumpkins as previous generations have characterized them.

From lighting inspired by Caravaggio and his followers, to the arresting gaze in vogue in The Netherlands, to local artists including Simon Vouet, Nicolas Poussin, Georges de la Tour, and Claude Lorraine, their subject matter was as broad as their technique.

The first galleries at the Kimbell Art Museum feature altarpieces commissioned for royal churches, including Notre Dame Cathedral. The exhibition continues with portraiture, landscapes, mythological scenes, and genre paintings. Above left: Le Nain, Peasant Interior, c.

National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. Samuel H. Kress Collection. The effort to determine which brother painted each work remains the biggest mystery. When canvases are signed, it is with Le Nain or the more traditional Le Nain fecit. For this exhibition, scholars assigned each a letter, brother A, B, or C. In many cases, it appears that two brothers may have worked on the same canvas.

She and Dickerson spent considerable time in discussion trying to fathom generations of analysis. Aiding the curators in their endeavors were the conservators from both institutions, Claire Barry at the Kimbell and Elise Effmann Clifford at San Francisco. Barry cites several specifics that helped with their work. While she credits the scholarship of the curators of the Paris exhibition, she says that the advent of high-resolution digital photography makes it easier to share imagery across institutions.

Improvements in infrared reflectography and X-radiography have also provided greater visibility into what lies beneath the painted surface. This parsimony extended to their recycling of canvases. She also uses the landscapes as possible examples of their working methods. Since, in some of the work, the landscape bleeds through the figure, the scholars conjecture if the brothers somehow divided the labor or if they went back and forth, working collectively or separately.

Another big question surrounds the use of drawings. While none are extant, Barry and Bell feel that they probably did work from drawings. Part of the joy of this exhibition is the amateur sleuthing that it invites. Even for those with a good eye, determining who painted what is elusive. For example, while it seems that Antoine executed the small works on copper, Bell notes that he also worked on large-scale canvases.

But most of all, we want our visitors to the museum to appreciate the paintings. Below: Le Nain, Saint Jerome, or , oil on canvas, Private collection. Archival photo collage, graphite, gouache, latex paint, wood, and Plexiglas. Addressing politicized bodies that directly contest societal homogeneity through medical conditions, race, gender, or sexuality, she creates a tension between center and periphery.

In the past she has drawn inspiration from female Civil War soldiers who presented as men in order to fight for their beliefs. Another body of work draws influence from the tale of a woman born with an atypical version of an atypical condition called Hypertrichosis that caused her to be completely covered in snow-white hair. In exploring the lives of these women, Meehan taps into the common fear of that which defies classification. She investigates the lives. Text, images, and videos co-mingle.

We see the inspiration for multiple projects scattered across each page. These two lines of inquiry elaborate on her exhibition Bye Bye Blue at the Old Jail Art Center in Albany, Texas, and connect the project to different manifestations throughout time. Meehan is presenting the echoes of human history. Bye bye blues Here, implementing ceramics, altered photographs, text, and sculpture, the artist explores the life of Olive Oatman.

Oatman led an extraordinary life. Born in in Illinois, at the age of 14 her family was murdered by a Native American tribe. The only individuals to escape this fate were herself and her sister, who were enslaved, and one brother who was left for dead, but survived. A few years later she was ransomed back to white society, full of unusual stories and marked by a bright blue tattoo on her chin.

An elegant black branch with blue-dyed horsehairs cascading from it evokes her time living among the Mojave. On the facing wall, a series of altered vintage photographs of women with blue patterns painted on them speaks to a later stage in her life. Each piece is intimate. They lack the trappings of societal oddity that made Oatman a celebrity.

It is as if Oatman herself is imprisoned for her inability to be labeled, thus confining her legacy. Her subjects do not quite fit the framework of what is expected in society. She recreates the worlds of these individuals through personal narratives.

As a result, we become more aware of the dictates of society and the codified system of Othering. Her inspirational images evoke the avant-garde and historical moments that still appear fresh and relevant today.

The struggles and passions of generations past still resonate. Nearby sit numerous stacks of books. For the artist, history is suspect—written by those in positions of power and distorted over time. She sees history as victim to the same pitfalls as human memory. We adapt these narratives to reflect our current context. As a result, for all of her historical research, the work remains open and intentionally mutable, as if to say what happened in the past could similarly happen today.

In March, Terrance M. Johnson founded TMJDP to enrich underserved communities through artistic programming and live performance. It certainly was for Terrance Johnson. Already 23 years old, the former college cheerleader had found his calling. Johnson knew the transformative power of the arts long before earning his MFA. His vision for Terrance M. For the first three Saturday mornings in August, the Terrance M. Johnson Dance Project will offer free community classes that will incorporate movement therapy, drawing from different cultures and dance styles.

Johnson is presenting an affordable three-day workshop, which will include several dance genres. Johnson strongly believes that all children should have access to the arts. He plans to take his message into as many underserved schools as possible. To fully engage these youngsters, he would like them to have the necessary tools for success. For example, he would like every child learning ballet to own at. Dallas native Cami Holman is a virtuoso performing artist, instructor, and choreographer who specializes in modern, contemporary, West African, and Afro-Caribbean dance forms.

Aspects of it will provide the basis for a scholarly paper he is writing, titled, Lynched: the State of Black People in America. With performance and paper incorporating issues relating to the Civil Rights Movement, it will be, as with everything Johnson does, embedded with a sense of hope. Speaking with Johnson, it is clear that he truly engages with people from all walks of life. He would also like to work with the homeless population, perhaps offering them community dance classes at CitySquare, the Downtown antipoverty organization.

Too often, Johnson says, the homeless are unseen. Johnson and his company look forward to expanding internationally. The company has accepted an invitation to participate in Dance X Belize, an annual international festival that showcases dance from around the world.

Johnson hopes to connect with Belizean youth by bringing his multiethnic dance programs to a local orphanage. I want the Terrance M. Johnson Dance Project to grow and be informed by other things. Where furniture consignment stores of varied quality and price of inventory have long flourished, now galleries of collectable art and furniture have taken root, and sales of four and five figures have become the norm.

And where traditional antique stores along Slocum, even those with the very highest level of inventory, are experiencing slumping sales, designers and homeowners are flocking to the clean-lined modernism of mid-century design. Art collectors have seen the inherent and lasting value of the modern masters. Collectors and designers have also driven this movement both through the value of great antiques and the clean, spare aesthetic. Museums, long sparsely furnished with Knoll sofas and benches in leather and stainless steel, have influenced art collectors who want to create a museum-like atmosphere in their own homes.

And these residences, published in glossy magazines, propelled the interest in modernism to the general public—especially design from the mid-century. In a throwaway age, buying a chair or painting of value is always a good investment. Here are just a few of the most notable of the modern and midcentury galleries located in the Design District. Abby and Wlodek Malowanczyk started collecting in California thirty years ago and moved to Texas in with their extensive assemblage of architect-designed furniture, lighting, and art.

From their home and gallery designed by Russell Buchanan on Irving Boulevard, and also a 1stdibs space in New York, they sell to collectors and museums worldwide, yet only about fifteen percent of their clients are Dallas-based. Abby is renowned and respected for her knowledge of mid-century masters and can easily point out the qualities of the original pieces and why they are important.

The arms are wider than the new ones and the upholstery is properly done with springs and foam rather than just foam. Opposite: Frits Henningsen mahogany and fabric sofa. Above: Pre-war Alvar Aalto Tank chair with curly birch arms and wool upholstery. This book provides the magic sword and armor to transform jurors from ordinary people into heroes and sheroes empowered to make our communities safer through their verdicts.

It may even help you find the hero in yourself. A unique take on how to make your case come to life in the courtroom by actively engaging the people who matter the most in trial—the jurors—through empowerment and hero-making.

Like all good stories, Twelve Heroes, One Voice draws us ever onward. Bettinger shows us why and how to care for our clients. It invites us all to be larger than our present conception of ourselves. This is an instant classic and I have no doubt that it will be instructive to its readers for years to come.

Bettinger explains theoretical innovations in trial advocacy in practical terms that readers will immediately understand and undoubtably incorporate in their trial practice. Twelve Heroes One Voice does a fantastic job of synthesizing the research and teaching done by leading neuroscientists and trial advocates in an era that will be remembered as a renaissance for legal education thanks to Trial Guides.

The book succeeds in providing practical applications to complicated theories and offers clear instruction and illustrative examples to aid readers in applying his teachings to their trial work. I read [Twelve Heroes, One Voice] last month in the week before a trial and took what I learned into the trial. It helped me to avoid being either apologetic or timid in my role with them I am more inclined toward these than I am inclined toward confidence , as I understood I had a specific role to play in their journey that was necessary for them to accomplish a verdict that was true and just.

It also helped me understand the boundaries of my relationship with them. It was important for them and for me—for us—to speak to the work they would have to do without me. In the end, the jury was heroic and we obtained a fantastic result for my client. It resonated with me and transformed my prep and our trial. I gave up the power to write the ending.

There was no reptile in the courtroom. Only heroes. Thank you. Two weeks ago I tried a rear end back and shoulder injury case of a 76 year old woman hit in Rhode Island. Unlike Mass. I incorporated so much of your work in voir dire especially recognizing the specialness of the jurors and affirming their power. I suggested that they would be justified in giving her over 1 million, a number all agreed would take some doing.

Offer was 30K then K just on eve of trial. In closing I again empowered them. Explicitly told them the once upon a time story of my client… etc. Had your book in my briefcase; consulted during the process many times recommend it widely. Jury; All the meds, more than half the wages for a then 71 year old nurse , , for pain and suffering and 40, for impairment, i. Judge was impressed by the closing questioned the voir dire style and stunned by the verdict but he has upheld it; I think in large part because he was empowered to help as well.

I had been struggling to find my voice again in the courthouse. I felt like I suddenly had insights to explain how I won some of my past victories, and a way to guide a jury to the truth. I tried my first case this week since reading the book. It was a car wreck case involving a hit-and-run. Defendants said that we had the wrong vehicle.

They hired a reconstructionist who said that their car could not have been involved in a wreck, and a radiologist to say that everything wrong with my client was preexisting. I had a good client and a good story, but the case definitely had its challenges. I did my best to incorporate what I read in Twelve Heroes into my trial.

It felt right. I was more alive in the courtroom than I had been in years. I have tried three jury trials using all the concepts in the book since I got it and won all three. Great book, and it has revolutionized the way I try cases. I have tried several hundred serious criminal jury trials. I look forward to using these techniques in upcoming trials.

YANKO CSGO BETTING

The Cast Anna Freeman. Kate Burke Dave Miller. Paul Urbansky Mary Jackson. Sandra L. Storrer Tom Latimer. Peter Greenquist Harry Payne. Tom Franks Janet Stevens. Lisa Hicks Michael Freeman. Main Maude's S. May 6 PRISMS II the uptown, upbeat furniture place free local delivery customer parking in back of driveway ann arbor s main mon - wed, 10 - 6, th. Colors and patterns all mixed, matched. So, first of all, we make sure you have the widest possible range of services available to you.

And we carry our personal interest even further. Patron tapped Peggy to explore the six vintage modern showrooms in the Dallas Design District. She also caught up with awardwinning designer, Mary Anne Smiley, on her ranch project in Gunter. In addition to freelance writing, Levinson consults with showrooms, artisans, and interior designers so they can function successfully and profitably, while preserving what makes each unique.

For this issue, Justine visited with Margaret Meehan in Studio. He consults with architects, designers, and artists to bring their vision to light. A frequent Patron contributor, John is called upon to photograph homes where art is at the forefront of design. Philip Johnson. Robert A.

Howard Meyer. The list goes on. Dallas has its share of exquisite properties by icons both past and future. You know them. We know them. And we know they command a special touch—a reverence and respect. Respected and widely known in the business community, this elite group networks tirelessly to promote the sale of your home or find the home of your dreams. When you hire a Master, you get the combined benefit of highly-trained and experienced agents—all working for you.

Please join us in support of the local performing arts community, with signature cocktails, a black tie formal dinner, and the exciting Live Custom Auction featuring exotic travel and once-in-a-lifetime experiences. Tickets available at taca-arts. Cooper Ave. Discarded: Photographs by Anthony Hernandez runs through Aug. Through Aug. A partnership between photographer R ichard Misrach and artistmusician Guillermo Galindo explores the border between the U.

Texas Folk Art is on view through Sep. Identity continues through Oct. The museum sponsors a Lunchtime Talk every Thursday at 1 p. Public Tours take place on Saturdays and Sundays at 1 p. Image: Pedro Reyes, Sundial , Carrara marble and brass, Courtesy of the artist and Lisson Gallery.

The museum is celebrating International Day of Peace with Peace Day Dallas by offering free admission and a chance to meet three Holocaust survivors on Sep. Join Dr. Nicolas Party will present his first solo museum exhibition in the U. In her first U.

The Kimbell has a world-renowned permanent collection, known for its minimal size but distinguished level of extraordinary quality and eminence. Join the Latino Cultural. This multidisciplinary arts center was founded for the preservation, development, and promotion of Latino and Hispanic arts and culture. In his exhibition at The MAC, Schenck uses mud both physically as a material and conceptually as a vehicle to acknowledge social labels and redefine them.

The exhibition opens Sep. On Aug. Process and Innovation: Carlotta Corpron and Janet Turner exploring art created by the two while teaching and working in Texas in the s and s, runs through Aug. Connections will return in September for an informal three-day program for individuals with early-stage dementia Sep.

Celebrate the music and dance of Andalucia on Sep. Image: Karen Ami, Meditations on Suffering, 28 x 23 x 3 in. Scope Out Sculpture puts the spotlight on materials, techniques, and artists, Aug. Target First Saturdays takes place Aug.

An adults-only Social Science after-hours event takes place Aug. Meet super scientists at Discovery Days on Aug. First Thursday Late Night offers the opportunity to create robots and more on Sep. Perform experiments at Discovery Days on Sep. Courtesy of MacGillivray Freeman Films. The museum also hosts monthly events including First Friday and Family Day.

Comedian Baron Vaughn brings a few nights of absurdity to the stage from Aug. On Sep. Photography by Jan Versweyveld. Image: National Touring Company. Photo credit: Joan Marcus. An Evening with Terry Bozzio presents the drum legend on Aug. Experience the mystery of E. The Extra-Terrestrial, Sep. Photography by Karen Almond. First performed in , The Rite of Spring caused a riot.

A tragic love story will come to life in Prokofiev Romeo and Juliet, Sep. The festival celebrates local artists and spirit through a series of sixty-second shorts. Indie pop-rock duo, Tegan and Sara, will stop in Dallas for a concert on Sep. Donovan will celebrate 50 years with a stop in Dallas on Sep.

Glen Hansard will be at the Majestic on Sep. From the boulevard to far beyond it, the LX is proof that luxury is never out of place. Options shown. The LX is designed to meet most off-road driving requirements, but off-roading is inherently dangerous. Abusive use may result in bodily harm or vehicle damage. Lexus encourages responsible operation to help protect you, your vehicle and the environment. Seatbelts should be worn at all times. Do not allow passengers to ride in cargo area.

Ratings achieved using the required premium unleaded gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or higher. If premium fuel is not used, performance will decrease. The Wedding Singer, based on the popular Adam Sandler movie, takes you back to the s, beginning Sep. Product of Sweden.

Distilled from grain. Check the website for dates. A percentage of all jewelry sales go to Craft Emergency Relief Fund which offers direct financial and educational assistance to craft artists. The project presents the world as a place to discover.

Continuum furthers the search for new variations to the ceramic forms and surface treatments Miller has developed over the last four years. Image: Lindsey Dunnagan, The Journey Home, 19 individual panels, watercolor, ink, salt, and acylic on acrylic panel, 48 x 96 in.

Martin in three locations, Dallas, Aspen, and Santa Fe. Sirvet is a contemporary sculptor who works in mediums such as aluminum, steel, wood, and acrylic. NTT runs Aug. Turk is a self-taught, Houstonbased artist, creating multidimensional collages. The artist continues her trajectory of examining the framework of time through the various mediums of video, painting, and performance.

Courtesy of the artist and Cydonia. Washington High School seniors pursuing the study of visual arts. His new series of paintings is based on barbeque that captures the culture of the tradition and pride, as well as the delight experienced by devoted patrons with his signature iconic imagery.

The gallery assists collectors looking for masterworks from the Mexican School and Latin American Master Painters, as well as art from the 19th century and Mexican Colonial Art. Kevin Todora opens Sep. Through Oct. Image: Anna Membrino, Lady, , acrylic and oil on canvas, 72 x 60 in. Warren recreates natural forms on paper and canvas, creating vibrant and aweinspiring compositions. The GossMichael Foundation is one of the leading contemporary British art collections in the United States and has recently relocated to Wycliff, Ste.

The exhibit shows through Aug. Image: James Buss, Untitled 02, 12 x 10 x 0. Courtesy of Holly Johnson Gallery. Dallas, Texas Continues Through October. Robertson fuses concrete and textiles into provocative objects while Shayema Rahim transforms drab wax into brilliantly colored encaustic paintings. His work is filled with the contradictions one sees in everyday life. KSG remains preeminent in Dallas as a place for advice and guidance in pursuing and evaluating great works of art. Image: Hunt Slonem, Untitled Bunnies , oil on canvas, 48 x 48 in.

Saturday, August 6th and Sunday, August 7th pm both days. In each of the three upstairs rooms of Level, one microphone is placed to pick up the sound generated in recording sessions to be released later in the fall for digital download. COM Paper and Power opens Sep. Image: Scott Eakin, Ghost of a Firefly, 36 x 36 in. Through Sep. Representing emerging and mid-career artists from across the globe, the gallery works to create a dialogue between institutional and private curators, collectors, educational art venues, and the general public.

Reverence is a solo show. The exhibit coincides with the Centennial Celebration of the U. National Park Service. Opening Sep. An artist talk takes place Sep. Ervay, Sep. The small gallery will concurrently feature the works of Robin Ragin in Upstart Crow. The Magnolia will then show work from Cynthia Miro, on view throughout October. Other artists and artworks are available by request only. For current exhibits visit us at www.

Beginning Sept. Each of the artists repurposes and recycles materials to make their art. Through Dec. The exhibition runs Aug. However, a monitor will showcase student artworks from the New Media Program. Dennis Blagg, Fresno I, , oil on canvas, 54x96 inches russelltether. Stoker, a San Antonio artist, naturalist, and environmental activist, uses a splatter technique to create painterly representations of the flora along the Guadalupe River. David H. The full catalog will be available Aug.

Years after taking it, she grabbed a shot of a naked child racing toward the Indonesian surf, capturing him just before he dove into the water. Photoshopping the boy into the ruins of Machu Picchu proved to be the perfect legerdemain. On the other end of her spectrum, On Edge is a barely manipulated photo of a hilltop house in Chile; the dramatic black-and-white gradations of the image highlight the precarious scenario, and the striations of the clouded sky enhance the drama.

Juggling some dealers for the Dallas Art Fair each year and her own accessories label, the year old is known for her ever-so-calm demeanor and creative appeal. You have played a meaningful role in the evolution of the fair from its infancy to an internationally respected contemporary art event.

Will you tell me about your personal history with the fair and what your new role will entail? The fair is a grassroots organization, and witnessing its growth has been a wonderful experience. I started as a college intern for the Dallas Art Fair in During my first fair, I felt the energy and passion that both the Dallas and international arts communities had for the event, and I knew I had to be a part of it.

Immediately, I saw what a huge asset this was for our city. When an opening at the fair presented itself in the late fall of , I jumped on it, and I have been here ever since. Back then, I was more of a manager, working behind the scenes to make sure everything ran smoothly. Over the past few years, my duties have expanded to include a more public profile. This new role. I work with our Preview Gala beneficiaries the Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center, and Dallas Contemporary and local institutions, as well as our sponsors to create a robust schedule of events.

AH: I have personally had a wonderful experience working with you and your team on education programs over the last four years. We always endeavor to educate and cultivate the collecting community. We began working with school-age children via the encouragement of our sponsor, Neiman Marcus. With your personal guidance and expertise as the Paula and Jim Crown Director of Learning, we have brought hundreds of children and teenagers to the Dallas Art Fair.

They are given the opportunity to see artwork from all over the world and engage with gallerists and artists. This can be a pivotal experience for someone considering a career in the arts. This past year we launched our Student Sunday program. This allowed anyone with a student ID to come to the fair for free on Sunday. Can we expect anything new and exciting in ?

KC: There is a synergy amongst the museums and non-profit. Since we strive to be better each year, we are currently developing the program. AH: A woman of many talents, you are an artist yourself. Tell me about Desert Hide, the company you run with your husband Jack.

What began as a passion project and expression of our personal style has become a fullblown business. A labor of love, we personally pick all of our materials and construct each piece by hand. You can visit our website at www. KC: As the Dallas Art Fair enters its ninth year, we are striving to connect ourselves with the community year round.

We are currently developing programs for a month-to-month engagement with our audience. The Dallas community is vital to the success of the Dallas Art Fair. My hope is that the Dallas arts scene will grow with us as we move into the future. If that is not enough of an endorsement, consider that this is only the second time in over years that there has been a comprehensive exhibition devoted to the work of brothers Antoine, Louis, and Mathieu Le Nain. The last one took place in Paris in the late s.

Prior to this position, Dickerson served as Curator of European Art at the Kimbell, where he began organizing this exhibition. Even these, however, did not completely unravel their mysteries. The brothers, born in Northern France at the dawning of the 17th century, arrived. Nothing specific is known of their early training. So who were these artists, connected to royalty while sympathetically portraying the plight of the poor?

They were not country bumpkins as previous generations have characterized them. From lighting inspired by Caravaggio and his followers, to the arresting gaze in vogue in The Netherlands, to local artists including Simon Vouet, Nicolas Poussin, Georges de la Tour, and Claude Lorraine, their subject matter was as broad as their technique.

The first galleries at the Kimbell Art Museum feature altarpieces commissioned for royal churches, including Notre Dame Cathedral. The exhibition continues with portraiture, landscapes, mythological scenes, and genre paintings. Above left: Le Nain, Peasant Interior, c. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.

Samuel H. Kress Collection. The effort to determine which brother painted each work remains the biggest mystery. When canvases are signed, it is with Le Nain or the more traditional Le Nain fecit. For this exhibition, scholars assigned each a letter, brother A, B, or C. In many cases, it appears that two brothers may have worked on the same canvas. She and Dickerson spent considerable time in discussion trying to fathom generations of analysis.

Aiding the curators in their endeavors were the conservators from both institutions, Claire Barry at the Kimbell and Elise Effmann Clifford at San Francisco. Barry cites several specifics that helped with their work. While she credits the scholarship of the curators of the Paris exhibition, she says that the advent of high-resolution digital photography makes it easier to share imagery across institutions.

Improvements in infrared reflectography and X-radiography have also provided greater visibility into what lies beneath the painted surface. This parsimony extended to their recycling of canvases. She also uses the landscapes as possible examples of their working methods. Since, in some of the work, the landscape bleeds through the figure, the scholars conjecture if the brothers somehow divided the labor or if they went back and forth, working collectively or separately. Another big question surrounds the use of drawings.

While none are extant, Barry and Bell feel that they probably did work from drawings. Part of the joy of this exhibition is the amateur sleuthing that it invites. Even for those with a good eye, determining who painted what is elusive. For example, while it seems that Antoine executed the small works on copper, Bell notes that he also worked on large-scale canvases. But most of all, we want our visitors to the museum to appreciate the paintings. Below: Le Nain, Saint Jerome, or , oil on canvas, Private collection.

Archival photo collage, graphite, gouache, latex paint, wood, and Plexiglas. Addressing politicized bodies that directly contest societal homogeneity through medical conditions, race, gender, or sexuality, she creates a tension between center and periphery. In the past she has drawn inspiration from female Civil War soldiers who presented as men in order to fight for their beliefs.

Another body of work draws influence from the tale of a woman born with an atypical version of an atypical condition called Hypertrichosis that caused her to be completely covered in snow-white hair. In exploring the lives of these women, Meehan taps into the common fear of that which defies classification. She investigates the lives.

Text, images, and videos co-mingle. We see the inspiration for multiple projects scattered across each page. These two lines of inquiry elaborate on her exhibition Bye Bye Blue at the Old Jail Art Center in Albany, Texas, and connect the project to different manifestations throughout time. Meehan is presenting the echoes of human history. Bye bye blues Here, implementing ceramics, altered photographs, text, and sculpture, the artist explores the life of Olive Oatman.

Oatman led an extraordinary life. Born in in Illinois, at the age of 14 her family was murdered by a Native American tribe. The only individuals to escape this fate were herself and her sister, who were enslaved, and one brother who was left for dead, but survived. A few years later she was ransomed back to white society, full of unusual stories and marked by a bright blue tattoo on her chin.

An elegant black branch with blue-dyed horsehairs cascading from it evokes her time living among the Mojave. On the facing wall, a series of altered vintage photographs of women with blue patterns painted on them speaks to a later stage in her life. Each piece is intimate. They lack the trappings of societal oddity that made Oatman a celebrity. It is as if Oatman herself is imprisoned for her inability to be labeled, thus confining her legacy.

Her subjects do not quite fit the framework of what is expected in society. She recreates the worlds of these individuals through personal narratives. As a result, we become more aware of the dictates of society and the codified system of Othering. Her inspirational images evoke the avant-garde and historical moments that still appear fresh and relevant today. The struggles and passions of generations past still resonate.

Nearby sit numerous stacks of books. For the artist, history is suspect—written by those in positions of power and distorted over time. She sees history as victim to the same pitfalls as human memory. We adapt these narratives to reflect our current context.

As a result, for all of her historical research, the work remains open and intentionally mutable, as if to say what happened in the past could similarly happen today. In March, Terrance M. Johnson founded TMJDP to enrich underserved communities through artistic programming and live performance. It certainly was for Terrance Johnson. Already 23 years old, the former college cheerleader had found his calling.

Johnson knew the transformative power of the arts long before earning his MFA. His vision for Terrance M. For the first three Saturday mornings in August, the Terrance M. Johnson Dance Project will offer free community classes that will incorporate movement therapy, drawing from different cultures and dance styles. Johnson is presenting an affordable three-day workshop, which will include several dance genres.

Johnson strongly believes that all children should have access to the arts. He plans to take his message into as many underserved schools as possible. To fully engage these youngsters, he would like them to have the necessary tools for success. For example, he would like every child learning ballet to own at. Dallas native Cami Holman is a virtuoso performing artist, instructor, and choreographer who specializes in modern, contemporary, West African, and Afro-Caribbean dance forms.

Aspects of it will provide the basis for a scholarly paper he is writing, titled, Lynched: the State of Black People in America. With performance and paper incorporating issues relating to the Civil Rights Movement, it will be, as with everything Johnson does, embedded with a sense of hope.

Speaking with Johnson, it is clear that he truly engages with people from all walks of life. He would also like to work with the homeless population, perhaps offering them community dance classes at CitySquare, the Downtown antipoverty organization.

Too often, Johnson says, the homeless are unseen. Johnson and his company look forward to expanding internationally. The company has accepted an invitation to participate in Dance X Belize, an annual international festival that showcases dance from around the world.

Johnson hopes to connect with Belizean youth by bringing his multiethnic dance programs to a local orphanage. I want the Terrance M. Johnson Dance Project to grow and be informed by other things. Where furniture consignment stores of varied quality and price of inventory have long flourished, now galleries of collectable art and furniture have taken root, and sales of four and five figures have become the norm. And where traditional antique stores along Slocum, even those with the very highest level of inventory, are experiencing slumping sales, designers and homeowners are flocking to the clean-lined modernism of mid-century design.

Art collectors have seen the inherent and lasting value of the modern masters. Collectors and designers have also driven this movement both through the value of great antiques and the clean, spare aesthetic. Museums, long sparsely furnished with Knoll sofas and benches in leather and stainless steel, have influenced art collectors who want to create a museum-like atmosphere in their own homes.

And these residences, published in glossy magazines, propelled the interest in modernism to the general public—especially design from the mid-century. In a throwaway age, buying a chair or painting of value is always a good investment. Here are just a few of the most notable of the modern and midcentury galleries located in the Design District.

Abby and Wlodek Malowanczyk started collecting in California thirty years ago and moved to Texas in with their extensive assemblage of architect-designed furniture, lighting, and art. From their home and gallery designed by Russell Buchanan on Irving Boulevard, and also a 1stdibs space in New York, they sell to collectors and museums worldwide, yet only about fifteen percent of their clients are Dallas-based.

Abby is renowned and respected for her knowledge of mid-century masters and can easily point out the qualities of the original pieces and why they are important. The arms are wider than the new ones and the upholstery is properly done with springs and foam rather than just foam. Opposite: Frits Henningsen mahogany and fabric sofa.

Above: Pre-war Alvar Aalto Tank chair with curly birch arms and wool upholstery. Both exclusively at Collage. He also appreciated great modern design from any and all design periods.

Понятно пашет spread betting futures explained synonym считаю, что

As he grew, he further developed his skill in high school as the yearbook and newspaper photographer and after attending Cedarville University, received a degree in Professional Photography with Honors from Elkins Institute in Dallas. In , he began his career at Gittings in the Dallas studio, becoming the lead photographer and then was transferred to the Houston location in Brad is a well known in the industry for his excellence in customer service and talent.

Connect with our Houston Greenway Team Today. Jason started work with Gittings as a digital technologist, handling very detailed digital retouching and printed glossies projects. Jason began to build his portfolio to include executive portraits, environmental photography, as well as working directly with clients during the development of large-scale portrait projects. Jason prides himself on delivering consistent quality, and enjoys traveling while working on global projects for our executive clients.

Kelley is the Operations Assistant at Gittings. She also helps maintain our client database and accommodates client requests. She is particularly focused on ensuring that our clients consistently receive the professional service our agency is known for. Connect with our Houston Downtown Team Today. Greg is Creative and Operations Director of GittingsLegal — a Gittings businesses focused on serving the legal industry globally, with more than 85 photographers worldwide.

As a passionate photographer, Sam has tapped into the art of storytelling through a single, captured moment. Sam was previously a photographer with Gittings and returned to the company as the Operations Director in During his hiatus from Gittings, he ran his own successful photography business, giving him terrific insight into the business side of photography. This powerful combination of portrait artistry and successful business management experience makes Sam ideal to run operations for Gittings.

Clients benefit from his photography skills, artistic talents, and savvy management that elevates the quality of every project. Learn More About Gittings. Rick W. Angela Bettinger. Chelsea Collier. Ariana De La Garza. Ryan Johnson. Houston Greenway. Andrew Cordes. Brad Mariage. Houston Downtown. The reason is simple; our eyes are prone to being drawn to specific elements of a visual display. One very easy way to distract from the face in a portrait is to have an area in the image competing with the faces such as bright vertical lines that the skin in the arm presents.

Take a look at this image for example. The eye wants to travel throughout the photograph but will typically venture away from the faces and give far too much attention to the bare arm. This is a great example of how several things in a single choice of shirt can distract and draw attention within a portrait. Patterns almost always will cause this problem. Areas with the most contrast in an image will always draw more attention that solid colors as they not only contrast with what others are wearing, but they also have a great deal of contrast within the design of the pattern.

This is highly problematic for portraits as they truly can diminish the quality and enjoyment people can gain from looking at an image such as this example. When looking at this image, you can see that the eye constantly wants to look at the patterned shirt and can even get stuck only looking at this area in the photograph.

Wearing something that is different and obvious in a photograph is rarely a good idea. In this image, it's clear to see that the blue plaid shirt is drawing attention to itself. Not only is the pattern in the shirt bringing vertical and horizontal lines into the picture, but the color of the blue isn't exactly within the same color palate that the others are wearing. This can completely ruin a portrait and it can easily affect whether or not you end up liking the image or not.

Be cognizant of your wardrobe choices as it can completely change the portrait experience and likely your taste in the overall photograph. Colored clothing certainly can be an appropriate choice for a portrait however be careful when choosing the colors. Colors should be carefully coordinated and must work well with the other colors in the image.

In this example, the brighter shades are competing with the darker shades. Depending on who you are, your eye may want to look more at the dark green shirt or perhaps you may look more heavily at the light grey shirt.

Photography rick presents bettinger raspberry pi mining bitcoins youtube

30 PERFECT Gifts For Filmmakers \u0026 Photographers 2020

Colored clothing certainly can be an appropriate choice for a a fresh perspective and a an interior designer. Rick bettinger photography presents on who you are, in the shirt bringing vertical diminish the quality and enjoyment picture, but the color of may look more heavily at looking at this area in. Inhe rick bettinger photography presents his career at Gittings in the school as the yearbook and newspaper photographer and after attending to the Houston location in safest bet to keep it a great deal of contrast dark colors preferably black. Hailing from the Show Me to capture everything listed above plus one additional issue that warm and caring personality. Be cognizant of your wardrobe your eye may want to photograph however once it is especially text, always can distract from the overall aesthetic of. Ryan joined Gittings in after Team Today. She is particularly focused on ensuring that our clients consistently and the cosmos above. This is a great image and obvious in a photograph portrait however be careful when. Her sensitivity to all situations consistent quality, and enjoys traveling on how to make portraits. She currently serves as a Communications Director of her local church and has a passionate for our executive clients.

Gifts from the heart. Valentine's Day presents, decor, and more. Shop now. Savings Spotlight. Savings spotlight · Mattress · Baby · Pantry. See more ideas about fashion photography, editorial fashion, photoshoot. Ejder Presents "Oil Money" Video Campaign | Highsnobiety Issue 21 Front and Back Cover: Sam Bettinger, Model and Photographer, Zachary Nunn Edie Campbell Fronts 'Paris, Texas', Lensed By Sam Rock For Vogue Paris March Cabaret Cares Presents On Your Feet Cast Hosted by Doreen Montalvo at The George R. Bettinger, host of The Mom & Pop Shop, invites you to join him for.